CraneHanaDesigns now on Etsy

Trying another sales portal, this time on Etsy: https://www.etsy.com/shop/CraneHanaDesigns

 

I’m conflicted about Etsy. They’re the best game in town for many crafters. They’ve made some colossal blunders in the past, and I feel terrible for them that the only way they can save the company now is at the cost of their allegedly benevolent company ethos.

I say ‘allegedly’ because many of those blunders involved touting themselves as a ‘handmade item’ portal, while allowing some of the worst of the buy-sell trade to dominate many of their categories. Buuutt…Etsy took itself public, and now pays the price with stockholders who don’t actually give a damn about ethics.

Maybe they…and we…can strike a balance between Return-on-Investment and the love of skilled handmade work.

We’ll see.

 

 

Blood Orange and Jasper Magic Wand

Or: faux inlay technique on wood.

I make artifacts and jewelry, along with book art and a ton of other largely useless but fun things. I belong to a loose-knit group of like-minded souls who, upon occasion, will make Harry-Potter-inspired magic wands as props and cosplay pieces.

This newest piece is made from a Blood Orange tree twig woodburned and painted, with a lanyard of braided waxed blue-gray polyester cord strung with Picture Jasper and Blue Lace Agate beads. The stick is about 14″ long and .75″ at its widest.

I’ve had the twig for 15 years. It came from a Blood Orange bonsai attempt that died at two years old. The corkscrew end is part of the root, and shows the stress on the tree. (I am never starting another bonsai again. It’s cruel, the tree equivalent of foot-binding.) I kept the dried-out little trunk because it was beautiful in its frozen misery, and a stern reminder of boundaries I shouldn’t cross again.

When I decided to make a prop wand from it, I stripped off the bark with a Dremel sander tip, then polished with successively finer sandpapers up to 600 grit. 

I did the spiraling design on the twig freehand with a temperature-controlled woodburning pen with a chisel tip. That allowed me to sink deep, precise marks along the wood. The resulting resins got scrubbed off with 90% alcohol and an old T-shirt. This cleaned off the soot and oils that could otherwise retard paint and varnish. The stick looked like this…

Painting time! I mixed a blue/turquoise/gray acrylic paint slip and worked it into every burned line, then painted a layer over the whole stick. That got to dry for a day. I chose blue-gray because it’s a color out of a fantasy series I’m working on, and I want do do some book covers in this look eventually.

(I can imagine that an earthwitch out of my Lonhra Sequence books might use a version of this thing.)

orangwwood wand detailWith another old T-shirt and more alcohol, I rubbed off most of the paint, until the buttery-yellow bare wood showed and the burned lines were filled with blue-gray paint. Once that dried for another day or three, I sanded again with fresh 600 grit black wet-dry paper.

This leaves a general effect of bare wood + colored inlaid lines bordered with the dark brown burned edges of the design. Covered with an oil-based or clear resin varnish, the effect looks even more like inlay. I use this technique a lot on wood book covers, because it adds subtle, precise surface detail.

The lanyard is Gray 4-ply waxed polyester cord from Maine Thread Co, in a triple-strand braid. The tan/cream/brown Picture Jasper rectangular tubes came from a $4 thrift store necklace I found last week. From The 30-Year Stash, I already had tumbled nuggets of Blue Lace Agate with the right mix of gray-blue and white banding and tan matrix.

On pyrography: Some folks do woodburning on leather (I don’t like the smell, or the result, but that’s only my take on it.) You may not get as deep or as controlled a brand line as you might on wood. Be careful when scrubbing/sanding off the top layer, as you can ‘suede’ your leather accidentally.

If you want to try this look, you can use the regular hobbyist single-temperature ‘soldering iron’ type of woodburning pen. I’ve found that my variable-temp professional pyrography unit with multiple tips is an amazing drawing tool. It’s more than paid for itself in the decade-and-a-half since purchase.

What am I going to do with this wand? Hang it up to look at for a while, maybe sell it later. It’s a proof of concept. The value for me lay in the crafting, so I can apply the look elsewhere.

Dragon Batik, a PussyHat, and the Tax Day March

A test piece from circa 1991, made with scrap linen, plain old paraffin wax, acrylic dyes, a lot of cheap paper towels and a thrift-store iron, and a design borrowed from Balinese carvings and an amaaaazing Chinese celadon vase (Thank you, ASU West Library).

I’m posting it because it’s fun, fierce, and there’s only so many times a day I can poke at Donald Trump.

Although…

While I was digging this piece out of storage, I ran across another old hall costume orphan: a cotton muslin Legionnaire’s cap with backflap. In a fit of madness one year in the Aughts, I dyed bright salmon pink for a Halloween stunt, then stuck a camel’s worth of fringe and beads on it. A few years later, some of the adornments came off, to be stitched on something else. I almost donated the piece to Goodwill last year.

“Hey self,” I said while eyeing the cap’s possibilities. “It’s PINK.” I have fabric in matching and complementary shades, and another camel’s worth of more fringe and beads. I have a whole outfit the same color, heh heh.

I think it can be turned into a spectacular PussyHat, and I can make others out of the scraps.

There are rumblings across social media, that, since The Donald seems afraid to release his tax returns; that the Women’s March on Saturday seemed to really piss him off; and that many of us just like banging on cages…we might be aiming to march again on Saturday, April 15, just before the US Tax Day.

Earlier in March (TBA), a lot of angry scientists are planning a march of their own.

Will you join us?