End of an Era: Loose Id

 As per this Facebook post, the erotic romance publisher Loose Id is closing. https://www.facebook.com/LoosenYourId/posts/10156261079630101

The four owners (The Quad, in LI nicknames) have decided not to squander the market’s good will, and are winding down the business by May of 2018.

This was my first romance publisher: they took on the first edition of my M/M space opera ‘Moro’s Price’ when no literary agencies or Big Five publishers would. For the most part, for the first few years with Loose Id, I was satisfied with sales and marketing. When it came time to renew rights again in summer of 2016, I decided to end my contract. I have no ill feelings toward LI at all. It just became apparent that my style of writing wasn’t going to sell that much in their current catalog. Eventually, ‘Moro’ went on to NineStar Press, a stunning new cover, a tighter revised second edition, and a whole new series opening up in the next couple of years.

What happened to Loose Id?

Amazon, certainly. The rise of Amazon’s behemoth publishing schemes have decimated earnings at many smaller publishers. The abrupt closure of All Romance Ebooks last year sent many publishers panicking, as it had been (on paper) sometimes a bigger seller than Amazon. Loose Id’s prices had always been read as high compared to other romance publishers, and their attempt to bring down those prices in recent years was apparently too little too late.

The romance publishing industry is changing in interesting ways, as well. Big Five and larger independent imprints are at least paying lip service to diversity in romance, which may be opening up new opportunities for authors formerly only able to publish with smaller niche presses.

While romance readers still make up the majority of genre book readers, crossover stories with other genres are becoming more common and popular among both romance readers and other genres like mystery and SFF. Readers (and agents and editors) are more open to LGBTQI and POC characters and writers. The super-raunchy, at-least-one-sex-scene-a-chapter formula (adopted by many early 2000s erotic romance publishers) was a reaction against the ‘fade-to-black’ coy sex of most mainstream romances in the 1980s and 1900s. But a counter-backlash is building against excessive or gratuitous sex scenes, especially as Millennials ramp up their buying power and preferences in the reading market.

Quality of work, not unrelenting quantity, is a sought-after feature especially in the saturated self-pub romance markets. Writers can still make a bundle from releasing at least one book a month, but the quality has to be there, or seasoned readers get quickly bored.

I hope Loose Id is able to unwind with as little stress and confusion as possible, and their remaining authors find their way to new opportunities. I hope remaining erotic romance publishers take note of the changing market, instead of wallowing in denial (like Ellora’s Cave, for example.)

Shame on Samhain

A brief but long overdue update, on erotic romance publisher Samhain. After announcing their closure late in 2015, they regrouped in a flurry of activity over 2016.

But they’re closing for real at the end of February 2017, only a few days after releasing a last round of contracted books. Those first rights are burned, and how much will those authors earn now in less than a week of sales? I’ve seen new authors who actually submitted mms to Samhain over 2016, when many seasoned authors warned them off. Loyal readers are scrambling to back up their digital libraries.

The company had a good run over much of its eleven years. I’m sorry to see Samhain go, but wish they could have kept their first promises and folded more responsibly last year.

The death of the romance industry small presses…claims another round of victims.

Update 2-12-2017: In a move eerily like their announcement in 2016, Samhain announces it will retain a handful of employees and ‘wind down’ company sales to help satisfy customers. During this process, as rights come due, those will be reverted to the authors. Ready-to-launch books will still be sold. Uncompleted projects will be reverted.

Potentially, this means that a Samhain title released in late February of this year might not go out of contract for 7 more years…or by March of this year. We don’t know yet, because we don’t have a ‘lights out’ date for Samhain. A potential title (contracted but not ready for release as of February 2017) would be reverted this month to its author.

Now, this is just a year’s delay of closure, not long in the publishing world. Samhain is closing because of poor ebook sales. So it’s very likely those remaining Samhain authors are not going to see the sales levels they might have, from back in the company’s glory days. How much marketing and promo will Samhain do now, over how long the company winds down?

I still think it was irresponsible of Samhain to solicit and contract more authors between 2016 and 2017, but at least the company appears to have a plan in place.

If you love erotic romances and Samhain authors, keep buying while you can…and back up your digital library!